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Room with a View: Glass Mezzanines
Room with a View: Glass Mezzanines
Round-Ups
June 13, 2024

Room with a View: Glass Mezzanines

Not quite a second storey per se, mezzanines have been a popular and efficient tool for maximising vertical space for ages. A glass mezzanine levels everything up.

Not quite a second storey per se, mezzanines have been a popular and efficient tool for maximising vertical space for ages. These designs level-up the loft-like level with glass – adding some privacy while letting the light flow right on in.

Kate Kolberg
Writing:
Writing:
Kate Kolberg
Photography:
Photography:
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Mezzanines in Small Spaces

Mezzanines are nothing new, with examples of them popping up as far back as ancient Roman architecture. Not quite a second storey per se, the loft-like level saw a boom during the Industrial Revolution as an efficient way of maximising vertical space. And it is for very similar reasons that they are a popular design tool in small spaces as well – providing some supplementary footprint for a separated room without cramping the feel of the main level. 

Beyond the additional footprint, one of the primary advantages of a glass mezzanine is how they allow for some extra privacy. By placing a room – often the bedroom – in a mezzanine, the lower level becomes the space for communal activities and entertaining, while the mezzanine level can be reserved as a private and more intimate zone. There is no strict rule as to whether a mezzanine needs to be open or closed, so to level up mezzanine privacy, many architects and interior designers are enclosing them with glass.

Separate but Together

Glass mezzanines have the additional benefits of creating a seamless visual connection between the different levels of a home and, most popularly, do not restrict the flow of natural light. By using transparent materials like tempered glass, designers can maintain an uninterrupted sightline and let light permeate throughout the space. It’s worth mentioning that this goes both ways! Windows within a mezzanine room will be able to transmit their light to the lower level just as much as they receive light from the lower level. This not only enhances the overall brightness of the interior but also creates a sense of expansiveness, making the area feel more airy and spacious.

Some of you might be wondering how having a big window into your bedroom counts as privacy. Fair. The reality is it’s not going to be fully private, but you would need a particular vantage to see all the way into the room – a vantage that many small spaces do not offer due to their small footprints. As well, there is something to be said for the sound privacy that the glass allows, ensuring that additional degree of separation between what’s happening upstairs and downstairs. For example, a person still asleep can be spared from their early riser significant other making coffee at 6am. If the height allows it, glass-enclosed mezzanines are one of the best solutions out there for gaining some extra private space in a small home – and doing it in style.

Writing:
Writing:
Kate Kolberg
Photography:
Photography:
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